Announcements

The MTBS project has released the NDVI Profile Tool. This interactive web application gives users the ability to display a multi-temporal NDVI profile that is spatially averaged by a user-defined Landsat Path/Row and categorized by land cover type.

MTBS released 1,337 new fires to MTBS.gov bringing the total number of fires mapped by the
project to 21,673. This data release contains all 2016 fires. With this release the MTBS data
record now spans the years 1984 through 2016.

MTBS has removed several attribute fields from the National Fire Occurrence Dataset. The
removed fields are Fire Year, Fire Month, Fire Day, WRS Path, WRS Row, P Acres, R Acres, State,
Admin, MTBS Zone, GACC, HUC4 Code, HUC4 Name, Version, Revision Code, and Release Date.

The complete dataset for 2016 fires is anticipated to be released Summer 2018. Please check back here for additional updates.

MTBS has discovered an issue in the rendering of our KMZ data when viewed in Google Earth. Caution should be exercised when viewing these data. We are working with Google to rectify this issue and will provide another announcement when it is resolved.

The annual MTBS training occurred April 18, 2018. You can find a link to a recorded version of the webinar and GIS exercise materials on our Training & Outreach page.

MTBS released 1,153 new fires to MTBS.gov bringing the total number of fires mapped by the project to 20,340. This data release contains all 2015 fires. With this release the MTBS data record now spans the years 1984 through 2015.

MTBS has removed several attribute fields from the National Burned Area Boundaries Dataset. The removed fields are Data Version, Revision Code, and Release Date.

MTBS released 554 new and revised fires to MTBS.gov bringing the total number of fires mapped by the project to 19,189. This data release contains the remaining 2014 fires. With this release the MTBS data record now spans the years 1984 through 2014.

At the beginning of the MTBS project (2006), Landsat imagery was not freely available and the project could not purchase more than two Landsat scenes per year for any path/row. Consequently, ideal imagery was not always used to map each fire. Image selection was often a compromise between optimum phenology and the number of fires that could be mapped.